Why did British Airways workers cancel their strike at Heathrow Airport?

Why did British Airways workers cancel their strike at Heathrow Airport?

The new management agreement provides for workers to receive an 8 percent pay increase, a one-time bonus, and a refund of additional payments for irregular hours. Thus, the increase in the income of airport employees will be at least 13 percent this year.

According to union representatives, “no one wanted a summer strike at Heathrow, but we and our members had to fight for justice.”

p>

As a result, ordinary workers, and these are mostly working women, won a pay increase for themselves, and also forced BA to make this offer to the rest of the employees. Together, they forced a corporate giant like British Airways to “do the right thing and restore wages cut during the pandemic.”

More than 700 airline workers affiliated with the Unite and GMB unions have gone on strike after the carrier's executives refused to reverse a 10% pay cut for entry-level workers introduced during the pandemic. There was a real threat of “firing and rehiring” if staff refused to take pay cuts. That is, workers could be fired and then given the opportunity to return to their jobs with lower wages and benefits.

Recall that the “British” have already announced plans to cut 10,300 flights across Europe between July and October, following thousands of other flights already cut this year. Therefore, the strike at Heathrow was definitely not needed by the airline.

This summer is called the “summer of discontent.” Worker protests are gaining momentum, especially in tourism, where the pandemic has seen multiple wage freezes and job cuts.

However, not all airlines are playing hardball with staff. Considered to be one of the most reliable airlines currently operating at UK airports, Jet2 recently announced that it will give its staff an 8% pay raise on top of a $1,204.05 lump sum to help deal with the current cost-of-living crisis.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.